Can NoSQL help us in processing Linked Data?

This is an announcement and call for feedback. Over the past couple of days I’ve compiled a short review article where I look into NoSQL solutions and to what extent they can be used to process Linked Data.

I’d like to extend and refine this article, but this only works if you share your experiences and let me know what I’m missing out and where I’m maybe totally wrong?

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Let’s think about all of this for a minute. Why aren’t we thinking about new and interesting ways to store our data?

Why Focus on Hybrid Data?

The idea behind hybrid data is that we use multiple databases instead of one database. Let’s say that we have an online store where we sell musical equipment. We want to store customer data in a relational database, but where should we store the rest of our information? Conventional thinking says that we should keep storing our data in a relational database. Sessions might be stored in memory somewhere and shopping carts might get stored in the database, but they’ll end up on faster, more expensive, solid state drives.There are other ways to store data.

Let’s think about all of this for a minute. Why do we force our databases into existing paradigms? Why aren’t we thinking about new and interesting ways to store our data?

Sessions are a great place to start. Sure, we could use something like memcached, but why not examine Redis or App Fabric Cache? Both of these databases have support for strongly typed data. They both allow the data to be persisted to disk, if needed, and they allow for data to be expired over time. This is perfect for working with any kind of cached data – it stays in a format our applications need but we can expire it or save it as needed.

The flexibility to store our data the way that applications use it is important. Session data should be rapidly accessible. Other applications don’t need to read it. It doesn’t need to be reportable. It merely needs to be fast.

Where Does This Fit Into the Enterprise?

Enterprises should be adopting these technologies as fast as they can. Not because they are replacing the relational database, but because they free the relation database from things it’s bad at and leave it to perform tasks that it excels at. Relational databases are great for core business logic – they have a lot of baked in functionality like data integrity and validation. As we’ve already discussed, relational databases are not well suited to storing highly volatile data.

By moving volatile data into better suited types of database, enterprises can increase the capacity of their database systems, provide redundancy, and increase scalability by using off the shelf solutions. The trick, of course, lies in integrating them. And that is what I’m going to be playing around with this year.

Source:

      A Technical Plan for 2011 by Jeremiah Peschka

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Emerging trends in technology, disruptive innovations and new developments in Information and web industry will affect the way we live. Trough this blog i select emerging and innovative tech and share my thoughts and experience in enterprises. more ...


         


         


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